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The Division of Science strives to provide faculty, students, and staff with the necessary resources to achieve excellence in scholarship and research. Comprised of 230 faculty members and 21 academic departments and units, the Division of Science has more than 1.5 million square feet of space dedicated to scientific research and teaching.

Faculty, students and staff have access to world-class research facilities, instrumentation, funding support, and a variety of workshops, seminars, and lectures. These resources are supported by the Division with the goal of advancing scientific knowledge and inspiring real-world solutions for current and future scientific challenges.

Latest News

Harvard scientists use simple materials to create semi-soft robots

Harvard scientists use simple materials to create semi-soft robots

June 13, 2017

At the beginning of the decade, George Whitesides helped rewrite the rules of what a machine could be with the development of biologically inspired “soft robots.” Now he’s poised to rewrite them again, with help from some plastic drinking straws.

Inspired by arthropod insects and spiders, Whitesides and Alex Nemiroski, a former postdoctoral fellow in Whitesides’ Harvard lab, have created a type of semi-soft robot capable of standing and walking. The team also created a robotic water strider capable of pushing itself along the Read more about Harvard scientists use simple materials to create semi-soft robots

Harvard climate study reveals ozone hole risk in Midwest

Harvard climate study reveals ozone hole risk in Midwest

June 8, 2017

Storms common to the Midwest in summer create the same ozone-damaging chemical reactions found in polar regions in winter, according to a new Harvard study. And with extreme weather on the rise, people living in the region could face an increased risk of UV radiation.

Powerful storms in the Great Plains inject water vapor that, with temperature change, can trigger the same chemistry eroding the Arctic ozone, according to a new paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Read more about Harvard climate study reveals ozone hole risk in Midwest

Physicists create antiferromagnet that may help them better understand superconductors

Physicists create antiferromagnet that may help them better understand superconductors

June 1, 2017

From the moment when physicists discovered superconductors — materials that conduct electricity without resistance at extremely low temperatures — they wondered whether they might be able to develop materials that exhibit the same properties at warmer temperatures.

The key to doing so, a group of Harvard scientists say, may lie in another exotic material known as an antiferromagnet.

Led by physics professor Markus Greiner, a team of physicists has taken a crucial step toward understanding those materials by creating a quantum antiferromagnet from an ultracold gas Read more about Physicists create antiferromagnet that may help them better understand superconductors

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