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The Division of Science strives to provide faculty, students, and staff with the necessary resources to achieve excellence in scholarship and research. Comprised of 230 faculty members and 21 academic departments and units, the Division of Science has more than 1.5 million square feet of space dedicated to scientific research and teaching.

Faculty, students and staff have access to world-class research facilities, instrumentation, funding support, and a variety of workshops, seminars, and lectures. These resources are supported by the Division with the goal of advancing scientific knowledge and inspiring real-world solutions for current and future scientific challenges.

Latest News

Researchers work to create kidney filtration barrier on a chip

Researchers work to create kidney filtration barrier on a chip

May 10, 2017

The kidney, made up of about a million tiny units that work to filter blood, constantly rids the body of undesired waste products to form urine. During the process, it also holds back blood cells and valuable proteins and controls the body’s fluid content.

Key to each of these units is a structure known as the glomerulus, in which so-called podocyte cells wrap themselves tightly around a tuft of capillaries. Separated by a thin membrane composed of extracellular matrix, slits are left between them to build an actual filtration barrier. The podocytes are also the target of… Read more about Researchers work to create kidney filtration barrier on a chip

Stem cell lines grown in lab dish may acquire mutations

Stem cell lines grown in lab dish may acquire mutations

April 26, 2017

Regenerative medicine using human pluripotent stem cells to grow transplantable tissue outside the body carries the promise to treat a range of intractable disorders, such as diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.

However, a research team from the Harvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI), Harvard Medical School (HMS), and the Stanley Center for Psychiatric Research at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has found that as stem cell lines grow in a lab dish, they often acquire mutations in… Read more about Stem cell lines grown in lab dish may acquire mutations

New vistas opening for brain disorder research

New vistas opening for brain disorder research

April 26, 2017

In a culture flask, 45 lentil-sized globs of neurons swirl in a gentle eddy of liquid medium. These lumpy, 3-D networks of human nerve cells, called brain organoids, have generated more diverse and mature cell types than any other model system of brain tissue to date.

Scientists have increasingly turned to organoids, organ models cultured from induced pluripotent stem cells, to investigate human brain development and disease. However, most brain organoid models to date have been cultured on a scale of weeks to investigate early neural development under various conditions… Read more about New vistas opening for brain disorder research

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